How To Say Sitting, Kneeling, Squatting, Bending Down and Standing In Spanish Language…

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Helen Lindberg
March 17 at 10:45pm
Hola,

I don’t know about you, but when I first started learning Spanish I almost went crazy learning how to say sitting, kneeling, squatting, bending down, standing-up, etc.

And not just literally standing up. But also as in the phrase “last night she stood me up again for our date.” Not that yours truly would ever need to know how to say that phrase in Spanish. LOL 🙂

Before I give you the link to my blog post on how to say sitting, kneeling, squatting, bending down, standing-up in Spanish, I want to share with you a phrase I learned today here in Medellin, Colombia while I was in an Uber on the “autopista” (highway) and saw several “muchachos” (young guys) popping wheelies on their “motos” (motorcycles).

For me learning a new phrase today is proof you never stop learning. In fact, I learned two phrases. I learned how Colombians say “to pop a wheelie.” And I learned the most commonly used phrase in Latin America for “to pop a wheelie.”

Anoche yo hice un pique en moto en este camino.
Last night I popped a wheelie on this road.

After doing some research online, I learned the phrase “hacer pique en moto” (to pop a wheelie) seems to be limited to Colombia. But in other parts of Latin America…

Anoche yo hice un caballito en moto en este camino.
Last night I popped a wheelie on this road.

So “hacer caballito en moto” is the most commonly used phrase in Latin America for “to pop a wheelie.” You can use either of the two phrases in Colombia. By the way, “caballito” literally means “little horse.” I guess because when someone pops a wheelie or “hacer caballito en moto” it looks like the movement a horse makes when a horse lifts its front legs.

Speaking of regional differences in Spanish…

In my blog post, I cover the most commonly used phrase for how to say “to stand someone up for a date” in Latin America. But if you want to know how to say it in Colombian Spanish…

Anoche no salimos al cine porque ella me dejó tirado.
Last night we did not go out to the movies because she stood me up.

So in Colombia “dejar tirado” means “to stand someone up (for a date)” You can, of course, use “dejar plantado” (to stand someone up) in Colombia just like anywhere else in Latin America and still be understood.

Got to go “ahora mismo” (right now) before I’m accused of “dejar tirado a alguien” (standing someone up) LOL 🙂

 

(International Desk..)